Website Search
ID 15305

Compiling the data from the Human Genome Project, Jim Kent

Description:
Interviewee: Jim Kent. Jim Kent, the author of the assembly program for the public sequence, talks about the challenge of reassembling the genome. (DNAi Location: Genome > The Project > Players >Technology > Reconstructing a shredded masterpiece)
Transcript:
If you could imagine taking perhaps, I don't know, ten copies of War and Peace, putting it through a shredder, and then just to make your life a little more interesting, put a copy of Anna Karenina, another big Russian novel, through the shredder as well. You mix them all up and then let them sit in the compost heap for about a month or so, so that now you've got all these little shreds of these books that are partly rotted away. And since you've got ten copies, you know, even though it's partly rotted, you should be able to string the whole thing together. But it would be a job, and in a sense that was our job. It was to take little overlapping strips of the genome and say, oh this little bit here is the same as this little bit here, so we can glue these two together to make a longer strip.
Keywords:
human genome project,compost heap,anna karenina,jim kent,russian novel,assembly program,dnai,war and peace,sequence data,interviewee,shredder,shreds,masterpiece,glue,little bit,job
Downloads:
Creative Commons License This work by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

Related content:

15304. Dealing with sequencing data, Jim Kent
Jim Kent talks about dealing with sequencing data.
15289. Translating the genome and Russian prose, Ewan Birney
Ewan Birney, a key figure in the public sequence analysis, talks about trying to find meaning in the sequence.
15314. Genome assembly, repeats, and reading the genome, Jim Kent
Jim Kent, the author of the assembly program for the public sequence, talks about the difficulties of reassembling small pieces of the genome when there are so many repeat sequences.
16121. A farm of computers, Jim Kent
Jim Kent talks about a farm of computers.
15307. The data structure of the human genome: poetry or prose?, Jim Kent
Jim Kent talks about the data structure of the human genome: poetry or prose?
15306. The difficulties of DNA assembly, Jim Kent
Jim Kent talks about the difficulties of DNA assembly.
15309. Junk DNA in the human genome, Jim Kent.
Jim Kent talks about junk DNA in the human genome.
15311. Telomeres and cell death, Jim Kent
Jim Kent talks about telomeres and cell death.
15291. Finding genes in the human genome, Ewan Birney
For the first draft of the genome sequence, both teams were working to identify the number of human genes. Here, Ewan Birney, a "numbers man" from the public genome project, explains how genes can be recognized and the data from the genome project used.
15310. Cell division and DNA, Jim Kent
Jim Kent talks about cell division and DNA.
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
CSHL HomeAbout CSHLResearchEducationNews & FeaturesCampus & Public EventsCareersGiving