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ID 15965

What is Prader-Willi/Angelman?

Description:
Genes on chromosome 15 show an effect called "imprinting." The effect of mutations in these genes varies depending on whether they are inherited from the mother or the father, which appears to play different roles in human development. Genes from the father govern the production of the placenta, and genes from the mother are responsible for organizing cells in the embryo, especially the head and brain.
Keywords:
chromosome 15,development genes,angelman,placenta,mutations,embryo,cells,brain
Creative Commons License This work by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

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