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ID 16180

Genes don't blend.

Description:
Breed pea plants to observe flower color.
Transcript:
HI! You are using pea flower color as an eighth trait to do plant breeding experiments like Mendel. You have a pure-bred colored flower plant and a pure-bred white flower plant. What will the F1 progeny be like if you cross-fertilize the colored flower plant with pollen from the white flower plant? The plants in the F1 generation will have either colored or white flowers if one trait is dominant. That is correct. All the plants in the F1 generation will have pale colored flowers. No, all the plants in the F1 will be pale-colored if neither trait is dominant. There will be plants that have all three flower colors: white, pale colored and colored flowers. No, all the flowers of one plant will have the same color. If the colored flower plant is cross-fertilized with pollen from the white flower plant, in the F1 generation, plants will either have colored or white flowers, if one of the traits is dominant. Let's try another cross. This time let's cross-fertilize the white flower plant with pollen from the colored flower plant. What will the F1 progeny be like? All the plants in the F1 generation will have pale colored flowers. No, all the F1 flowers will be pale colored if neither trait is dominant. The plants in the F1 generation will have either colored or white flowers if one trait is dominant. No, all the F1 flowers will be pale colored if neither trait is dominant. That is correct. There will be plants that have all three flower colors: white, pale colored and colored flowers. No, all the flowers of one plant will have the same color. In the F1 generation, plants will either have colored or white flowers, if one of the traits is dominant. In a cross between two pure-bred plants with different alleles for the same trait, it doesn't matter which plant contributed the pollen or the egg, the results are the same. CONGRATULATIONS! YOU'RE SO SMART!
Keywords:
pure-bred, F1 progeny,F1 generation, pea flower color, pea plants,cross-fertilize, dominant, alleles, mendel, progeny, pollen, genes, Gregor Mendel
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Creative Commons License This work by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

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16190. Problem 4: Some genes are dominant.
Cross pure-bred pea plants to identify dominant flower color.
16182. Animation 4: Some genes are dominant.
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Repeat Mendel's experiments with an eighth trait.
16154. Animation 2: Genes Come in Pairs
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16143. Animation 1: Children Resemble Their Parents
Gregor Mendel explains how traits are inherited.
16151. Biography 1: Gregor Mendel (1822-1884)
Father of Genetics
16301. Animation 12: Evolution begins with the inheritance of gene variations.
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16170. Animation 3: Gene's don't blend.
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16002. Gregor Mendel and pea plants
Children resemble their parents.
16169. Concept 3: Gene's don't blend.
Mendel discovered that pure-bred plants did not produce offspring with blended traits.
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