Website Search
ID 16236

All cells arise from pre-existing cells.

Description:
Look at the chromosome number of fruit flies.
Transcript:
HI! The common fruit fly is a favorite organism used by many genetic researchers. Let's look at the chromosome number of fruit flies. If fruit fly skin cells have eight chromosomes, how many chromosomes do fruit fly wing cells have? 8. That is correct. 4. No, try again. 16. No, that's too many. 0; only cells on the body have chromosomes. No, cells have chromosomes no matter where they are located. With the exception of sex cells (eggs and sperm), there will be the same number of chromosomes in all cells of the body. If fruit fly skin cells have eight chromosomes then wing cells will also have eight chromosomes. These body (somatic) cells undergo mitosis. Fruit fly somatic cells have eight chromosomes. During the metaphase stage of mitosis, how many chromatids are there? 4. No, there are more than 4 chromatids. 8. No, 8 is the chromosome number. 16. That is correct. 32. No, a fruit fly cell will not have 32 chromatids. There are two chromatids for every chromosome. Fruit flies have 16 chromatids during the metaphase stage of mitosis. At the end of mitosis, how many chromosomes does each daughter cell have? There are 32 chromosomes in each daughter cell. No, a fruit fly cell will not have 32 chromosomes. One cell will have 16 chromosomes, the other will have none. No, both daughter cells will have the same number of chromosomes. Each daughter cell will have 16 chromosomes. No, the cells have divided. Each daughter cell will not have 16 chromosomes. Each daughter cell will have 8 chromosomes. That is correct. By the end of mitosis, there are two daughter cells. Each daughter cell will have the same amount of genetic material as the parent – 8 chromosomes. CONGRATULATIONS! YOU'RE SO SMART!
Keywords:
wing cells, chromosome number, stage of mitosis, metaphase stage, daughter cells, sex cells, genetic material, fruit flies, somatic cells, chromatids
Downloads:
Creative Commons License This work by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

Related content:

16229. Animation 7: All cells arise from pre-existing cells.
Walther Flemming explains the phases of mitosis.
16238. Animation 8: Sex cells have one set of chromosomes; body cells have two.
Theodor Boveri presents chromosomes' role in development.
16237. Concept 8: Sex cells have one set of chromosomes; body cells have two.
Offspring arise from the union of specialized sex cells — a female egg and a male sperm.
16760. Animation 37: Master genes control basic body plans.
Eric Wieschaus and Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard explain research of Drosophila's developmental stages, and Ed Lewis presents homeotic mutations.
16668. Animation 32: Some DNA can jump.
Barbara McClintock presents her work with maize.
960. Causes, Smoking: p53
This series of animations shows how mutations in the p53 gene are found in 70% of lung tumors, the highest rate for any cancer.
16784. Animation 38: Development balances cell growth and death.
Leland Hartwell describes how cells regulate the timing of growth and cell division. Bob Horvitz and Mike Hengartner explain control mechanisms for cell death.
16228. Concept 7: All cells arise from pre-existing cells.
An overview of the discovery of cell division, mitosis.
16235. Biography 7: Walther Flemming (1843-1905)
In 1882, Walther Flemming published the definitive study of the cellular process of mitosis.
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
CSHL HomeAbout CSHLResearchEducationNews & FeaturesCampus & Public EventsCareersGiving