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ID 2219

DSM-IV criteria for bipolar disorder I and II

Description:
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV) diagnostic criteria for bipolar disorder.
Transcript:
The essential feature of Bipolar I Disorder is a clinical course that is characterized by the occurrence of one or more Manic Episodes or Mixed Episodes. The essential feature of Bipolar II Disorder is a clinical course that is characterized by the occurrence of one or more Major Depressive Episodes accompanied by at least one Hypomanic Episode. Diagnostic criteria for Bipolar I Disorder, Most Recent Episode Hypomanic A. Currently (or most recently) in a Hypomanic Episode. B. There has previously been at least one Manic Episode or Mixed Episode. C. The mood symptoms cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. D. The mood episodes in Criteria A and B are not better accounted for by Schizoaffective Disorder and are not superimposed on Schizophrenia, Schizophreniform Disorder, Delusional Disorder, or Psychotic Disorder Not Otherwise Specified. Diagnostic criteria for Bipolar I Disorder, Most Recent Episode Manic A. Currently (or most recently) in a Manic Episode. B. There has previously been at least one Major Depressive Episode, Manic Episode, or Mixed Episode. C. The mood episodes in Criteria A and B are not better accounted for by Schizoaffective Disorder and are not superimposed on Schizophrenia, Schizophreniform Disorder, Delusional Disorder, or Psychotic Disorder Not Otherwise Specified. Diagnostic criteria for Bipolar I Disorder, Most Recent Episode Mixed A. Currently (or most recently) in a Mixed Episode. B. There has previously been at least one Major Depressive Episode, Manic Episode, or Mixed Episode. C. The mood episodes in Criteria A and B are not better accounted for by Schizoaffective Disorder and are not superimposed on Schizophrenia, Schizophreniform Disorder, Delusional Disorder, or Psychotic Disorder Not Otherwise Specified. Diagnostic criteria for Bipolar I Disorder, Most Recent Episode Depressed A. Currently (or most recently) in a Major Depressive Episode. B. There has previously been at least one Manic Episode or Mixed Episode. C. The mood episodes in Criteria A and B are not better accounted for by Schizoaffective Disorder and are not superimposed on Schizophrenia, Schizophreniform Disorder, Delusional Disorder, or Psychotic Disorder Not Otherwise Specified. Diagnostic criteria for Bipolar I Disorder, Most Recent Episode Unspecified A. Criteria, except for duration, are currently (or most recently) met for a Manic, a Hypomanic, a Mixed, or a Major Depressive Episode. B. There has previously been at least one Manic Episode or Mixed Episode. C. The mood symptoms cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. D. The mood episodes in Criteria A and B are not better accounted for by Schizoaffective Disorder and are not superimposed on Schizophrenia, Schizophreniform Disorder, Delusional Disorder, or Psychotic Disorder Not Otherwise Specified. E. The mood symptoms in Criteria A and B are not due to the direct physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication, or other treatment) or a general medical condition (e.g., hyperthyroidism). Diagnostic criteria for Bipolar II Disorder A. Presence (or history) of one or more Major Depressive Episodes. B. Presence (or history) of at least one Hypomanic Episode. C. There has never been a Manic Episode or a Mixed Episode. C. The mood symptoms cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. D. The mood episodes in Criteria A and B are not better accounted for by Schizoaffective Disorder and are not superimposed on Schizophrenia, Schizophreniform Disorder, Delusional Disorder, or Psychotic Disorder Not Otherwise Specified. E. The symptoms cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.
Keywords:
bipolar, disorder, 1, 2, dsm, iv, criteria, diagnostic, statistical, manual, mental, disorders, fourth, edition, apa, american, psychiatric, association
Creative Commons License This work by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

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