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ID 1097

Synaptic Plasticity (2)

Description:
Professor Graham Collingridge explains that synaptic plasticity is the way most information is stored in the central nervous system.
Transcript:
Synaptic plasticity is the way in which we believe that most information is stored in the central nervous system. So, we have millions upon millions of neurons, which make on average 10,000 connections with each other, giving us about 10 to the [power of] 15 synapses. The way in which synapses communicate information isn’t constant with time but can be changed – it can be modified by plasticity.
Keywords:
synaptic, plasticity, synapse, plastic, store, information, processing, graham, collingridge
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