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"The Study of Human Heredity," by Davenport, Laughlin, Weeks, Johnstone, and Goddard, Eugenics Record Office Bulletin No. 2 (10)

"The Study of Human Heredity," by Davenport, Laughlin, Weeks, Johnstone, and Goddard, Eugenics Record Office Bulletin No. 2 (10)
Description:
"The Study of Human Heredity," by Davenport, Laughlin, Weeks, Johnstone, and Goddard, Eugenics Record Office Bulletin No. 2 (10)
Transcript:
1781. 10 Eugenics Record Office, Bulletin. to be studied, in that this mating produced the fraternity just described. The father, described as feeble-minded, should form the basis of an extended study. It is noted that his parents died at an old age but nothing further is known of either of them. If possible, they should be proven to be either normal or nervously affected. If normal, then it would be a profitable expenditure of time to search the ancestry and complete fraternities of each for the affected individuals, in order thoroughly to test the hypothesis in this mating. Likewise mating I-1 and 2 should be studied with a view to determining the nature of I-2; it is apparent that is I-2 is normal all of his five children should also be normal, and if they were so it would not be profitable to spend very much time in tracing further his blood. The fraternities II-1 to 5 and II-6 to 12 should be more thoroughly studied in that a detailed knowledge of each will throw light on the nature of the germ plasm producing II-5 and 6. More should also be known concerning the consort of II-7 and her "blood," inasmuch as this mating was productive of abnormal offspring. The other consorts of the II generation are not so important, if on investigation the offspring prove all to be normal. Likewise the consorts of III are not so important because their children are all very young; however, for study a few years hence it would be highly desirable to have these persons accurately described, and such description should be made if the requisite information can be secured without too great an expenditure of time. In this pedigree the field worker has charted the males to the right and the females to the left; this should be reversed for the sake of uniformity of practice. Indicate the year of birth on the pedigree only in the case of young children. This pedigree contains few persons marked (N), normal. It is highly desirable that every person studied should be so thoroughly described that he or she can either be safely marked (N) or given a proper mark designating the type of abnormality possessed. [end]
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