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Serotonin Receptors and SSRIs

Description:
Doctor Jon Lieberman discusses the propsed mechanism of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs), a controversial treatment for depression.
Transcript:
Depressed people have low serotonin levels. What SSRIs (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors) do, is keep serotonin at the synapses of the brain.
Keywords:
depression, treatment, serotonin, receptor, selective, serotonin, reuptake, inhibitors, SSRI, SSRIs, jon, lieberman,
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Creative Commons License This work by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

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