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ID 15683

Marshall Nirenberg and President Lyndon Johnson

Description:
Marshall Nirenberg (second left) explaining the genetic code to President Lyndon Johnson (second right) Cracking this "genetic" code became the biological challenge of the 1960s. The biological code-breakers may not have had the same cloak and dagger appeal as those involved in espionage; nevertheless, their detective work gave us a new understanding into the role of DNA.
Transcript:
Marshall Nirenberg (second left) explaining the genetic code to President Lyndon Johnson (second right)<br><br> Cracking this "genetic" code became the biological challenge of the 1960s. The biological code-breakers may not have had the same cloak and dagger appeal as those involved in espionage; nevertheless, their detective work gave us a new understanding into the role of DNA.
Keywords:
marshall nirenberg,president lyndon johnson,code breakers,detective work,genetic code,lyndon johnson,espionage,cloak,1960s,dna
Creative Commons License This work by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

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