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ID 2092

Basal Ganglia

Description:
The basal ganglia comprise a group of structures that regulate the initiation of movements, balance, eye movements, and posture.
Transcript:
The basal ganglia comprise a group of structures that regulate the initiation of movements, balance, eye movements, and posture. They are strongly connected to other motor areas in the brain and link the thalamus with the motor cortex. The basal ganglia are also involved in cognitive and emotional behaviors and play an important role in reward and reinforcement, addictive behaviors and habit formation.
Keywords:
basal ganglia, brain, motor, emotional behaviors, eye movements
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