Website Search
ID 15761

Hospital at the Viriginia Colony

Description:
The Buck vs. Bell decision opened the floodgate of eugenic sterilization. Prior to the trial, 18 states had statutes under which about 6,000 sterilizations had been performed. By 1935, 30 states had statutes, and more than 21,000 had been sterilized. Almost half of all eugenic sterilizations took place in California, where a vocal eugenics lobby was led by Paul Popenoe, E.S. Gosney, F.W. Hatch, and David Starr Jordan. In 1942, the Supreme Court struck down a law allowing the involuntary sterilization of criminals, but it never reversed the general concept of eugenic sterilization. Although eugenic sterilizations slowed after World War II, some continued into the 1970s, by which time an estimated 60,000 Americans had been sterilized.
Keywords:
david starr jordan,eugenic sterilization,involuntary sterilization,carrie buck,world war ii,gosney,popenoe,floodgate,eugenics,hatch,criminals,1970s,supreme court
Creative Commons License This work by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

Related content:

15734. Amherst County Courthouse, Virginia
Paul Lombardo discusses the initial trial in Amherst County, Viriginia, which set the stage for taking the issue of eugenic sterilization to the Supreme Court.
12190. "The Progress of Eugenical Sterilization," by Paul Popenoe, Journal of Heredity (vol. 25:1), including journal cover and contents page (5)
"The Progress of Eugenical Sterilization," by Paul Popenoe, Journal of Heredity (vol. 25:1), including journal cover and contents page (5)
12191. "The Progress of Eugenical Sterilization," by Paul Popenoe, Journal of Heredity (vol. 25:1), including journal cover and contents page (6)
"The Progress of Eugenical Sterilization," by Paul Popenoe, Journal of Heredity (vol. 25:1), including journal cover and contents page (6)
12199. Carrie Buck, from "The Progress of Eugenical Sterilization," by Paul Popenoe, Journal of Heredity (vol. 25:1)
Carrie Buck, from "The Progress of Eugenical Sterilization," by Paul Popenoe, Journal of Heredity (vol. 25:1)
12195. F.W. Hatch, from "The Progress of Eugenical Sterilization," by Paul Popenoe, Journal of Heredity (vol. 25:1)
F.W. Hatch, from "The Progress of Eugenical Sterilization," by Paul Popenoe, Journal of Heredity (vol. 25:1)
12196. E.S. Gosney, from "The Progress of Eugenical Sterilization," by Paul Popenoe, Journal of Heredity (vol. 25:1)
E.S. Gosney, from "The Progress of Eugenical Sterilization," by Paul Popenoe, Journal of Heredity (vol. 25:1)
15759. Oliver Wendell Holmes
The Buck vs. Bell case then went to the U.S. Supreme Court, where Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. gave the majority opinion.
10255. Buck vs. Bell Supreme Court Decision
Buck vs. Bell Supreme Court Decision
15227. Holmes' statements at Buck vs. Bell, Paul Lombardo
Paul Lombardo talks about Oliver Wendell Holmes' support for eugenic sterilization was contrary to his record as a defender of civil liberties.
15731. Carrie Buck roadside marker
In May 2, 2002, the 75th anniversary of the Supreme Court decision on Buck v. Bell, Virginia Governor Mark Warner publicly apologized for Virginia's past involvement in eugenics.
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
CSHL HomeAbout CSHLResearchEducationPublic EventsNewsstandPartner With UsGiving