Website Search
ID 1001

Causes, Viruses: HPV, Galloway clip 1

Description:
Professor Galloway explains that there are many HPVs that infect the genital tract and a set of those cause benign genital warts but another set is able to cause lesions that will go on and progress to cervical or other anal-genital cancers.
Transcript:
Denise Galloway, Ph.D., talks about HPV and its link to cervical cancer and how HPV infection affects normal cellular processes. “There are many HPVs that infect the genital tract and a set of those cause benign genital warts but another set is able to cause lesions that will go on and progress to cervical or other anal-genital cancers. I think the link is very firmly established. There are, have been many large international studies that have looked for the presence of HPV in cervical cancers and found that nearly 100% of them are positive for the viral DNA. I think the mechanisms are pretty well understood. When HPV infects the genital epithelium, it causes those cells to proliferate when they normally would not. It also causes the normal checkpoints that would prevent the cell from replicating if there is DNA damage or damage to the chromosomes, it inactivates those checkpoints so that the cells that receive damage can still continue to replicate.”
Keywords:
cervical cancers, viral dna, genital warts, dna damage, genital tract, cellular processes, cervical cancer, epithelium, checkpoints, chromosomes, lesions, galloway, hpv, mechanisms, cancer
Creative Commons License This work by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

Related content:

999. Causes, Viruses: HPV
In this section learn how viruses contribute to cancer development.
1002. Causes, Viruses: HPV, Galloway clip 2
Professor Galloway explains that viruses don't want to cause cancer, they just want to make more virus.
1000. Causes, Viruses: HPV, Steinberg
Professor Steinberg explains that HPVs are a family of related viruses, and they're small DNA tumor viruses that can cause tumors in either their natural host or another organism.
960. Causes, Smoking: p53
This series of animations shows how mutations in the p53 gene are found in 70% of lung tumors, the highest rate for any cancer.
15121. Little known in the 1970s about the causes of cancer, Mary-Claire King
Mary-Claire King speaks about how much was yet to be understood about the genetic mechanisms of cancer when she began her hunt for genes associated with breast cancer.
954. Causes, Smoking, all sections
This section explains that lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States and it is almost entirely preventable, since the vast majority of cases are due to cigarette smoking.
941. Hallmarks, Evading death
Professor Robert Weinberg discusses how cancer cells have to learn how to avoid the process of programmed cell death known as apoptosis carried out in normal cells.
951. Hallmarks, Promoting mutations
Bruce Stillman, Ph.D., president of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, explains that genomic instability is a characteristic of cancer cells.
16784. Animation 38: Development balances cell growth and death.
Leland Hartwell describes how cells regulate the timing of growth and cell division. Bob Horvitz and Mike Hengartner explain control mechanisms for cell death.
991. Causes, Mold: Aflatoxin, Kensler
Professor Kensler explains that Aflatoxin is a lipid soluble molecule that is rapidly absorbed and it goes first to the liver where there are enzymes that will chemically biotransform it into a very reactive chemical.
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
CSHL HomeAbout CSHLResearchEducationPublic EventsNewsstandPartner With UsGiving